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Did you choose an Ariya because you love your Leaf?

858 Views 10 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  BrooklynEVNut
While I still have a few more months (apparently) to make up my mind about the pending AWD Platinum+ purchase, I started thinking more honestly about why I decided the Ariya was for me.

After a bit of introspection, I arrived at a conclusion - I picked the Ariya, not because of the Airya per-se, but because of my Leaf.

I gotta be honest. I love my Leaf. My family loves it too. Everything about it has held up to all of my expectations, and more. Of the 2 dozen or so cars I've owned over the years, by far the Leaf was my 'smartest' purchase.

I say this mostly out of curiosity here amongst the community, and wanted to know if anyone else shares this sentiment?

Having ordered an AWD, I consider myself lucky - because I get to see what happens to all of you folks who are taking delivery of your FWD's now. And by the time I have to sign on the line which is dotted, this forum will likely have provided plenty of first-hand and honest assessment of what the Ariya is really like.

The Leaf set a high bar for trouble-free EV ownership, and a driving experience that isn't odd, or bothersome (in the way that I find bothersome a big vertical iPad glued to the center of the dashboard as some EV brands have chosen). But given the general goofyness and IMO disappointing behavior of Nissan during this whole Ariya ordering/buying experience, and the weird/arbitrary fed EV tax law changes since I placed my preorder so long ago, I'm really thinking it likely that I'm not going to be as happy with the Ariya as I have been with my Leaf (particularly if I don't get the $7500 credit).

Unfortunately, I think the 'Nissan' that rolled out the Leaf back in 2011, and the Nissan/Renault partnership that produced the Ariya, are indeed two different companies.

And as a life-long Datsun/Nissan/Infiniti fanboy, I find that kinda sad馃槬. I hope I'm wrong.
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While I still have a few more months (apparently) to make up my mind about the pending AWD Platinum+ purchase, I started thinking more honestly about why I decided the Ariya was for me.

After a bit of introspection, I arrived at a conclusion - I picked the Ariya, not because of the Airya per-se, but because of my Leaf.

I gotta be honest. I love my Leaf. My family loves it too. Everything about it has held up to all of my expectations, and more. Of the 2 dozen or so cars I've owned over the years, by far the Leaf was my 'smartest' purchase.

I say this mostly out of curiosity here amongst the community, and wanted to know if anyone else shares this sentiment?

Having ordered an AWD, I consider myself lucky - because I get to see what happens to all of you folks who are taking delivery of your FWD's now. And by the time I have to sign on the line which is dotted, this forum will likely have provided plenty of first-hand and honest assessment of what the Ariya is really like.

The Leaf set a high bar for trouble-free EV ownership, and a driving experience that isn't odd, or bothersome (in the way that I find bothersome a big vertical iPad glued to the center of the dashboard as some EV brands have chosen). But given the general goofyness and IMO disappointing behavior of Nissan during this whole Ariya ordering/buying experience, and the weird/arbitrary fed EV tax law changes since I placed my preorder so long ago, I'm really thinking it likely that I'm not going to be as happy with the Ariya as I have been with my Leaf (particularly if I don't get the $7500 credit).

Unfortunately, I think the 'Nissan' that rolled out the Leaf back in 2011, and the Nissan/Renault partnership that produced the Ariya, are indeed two different companies.

And as a life-long Datsun/Nissan/Infiniti fanboy, I find that kinda sad馃槬. I hope I'm wrong.
Yes, I think that it's likely I'm leaning to the Ariya because of my great experience with owning the Leaf. We really liked our 2011 and 2012 Leafs. We also had a 2019, but were less fond of the analog speedometer. I ordered the Premiere, no word on delivery yet, but I'm patient.
I too love and still drive my 2016 Leaf and as I looked at other EVs found reasons to not like them (Ford Mach-E has weird door handles, Tesla too expensive ...) and I'm hoping that the Ariya is just a better Leaf.

I am annoyed that all the Ariyas currently seem to have that brown/copper trim line (and this will quickly make the car look like "last year's model" when they change it), and I'm annoyed that it appears that to get some of the features (foot swing to open rear hatch, power-adjust steering column to make it easier to switch cars with my "much less tall wife", and cooled front seats) I'd need to get the AWD, which adds (literally) 600 pounds of stuff I don't need and has slightly less storage space.

So I'm waiting to see if when the car is eventually available in Canada there will be more/different configuration choices.
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I couldn't agree more, I bought a 2019 fully loaded Leaf Plus the first day they were available and I LOVE IT!
I ordered my Platinum plus long range the day orders opened because I love the leaf.
The more I drive my leaf, 50K today, the more I think maybe I don't need an aria, the leaf may be all I need


jay
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The only problem with my 30 kW鈥 2016 Leaf is the range. I often have a 200 km trip and it is an increasing hassle (as the public chargers get busier and more expensive) to have to stop and charge mid-way. And in the winter I have to drive at less than 95 km/h to even get the 100 km distance (with some extra margin).
I couldn't agree more, I bought a 2019 fully loaded Leaf Plus the first day they were available and I LOVE IT!
I ordered my Platinum plus long range the day orders opened because I love the leaf.
The more I drive my leaf, 50K today, the more I think maybe I don't need an aria, the leaf may be all I need


jay
What you said, is exactly where I'm at today, given everything that I know at the moment. That's not where I was when I ordered the Ariya, and I'm not blaming Nissan for this - but probably the biggest reason that I'm "not there" anymore is because the $7500 tax incentive is gone. Obviously you can thank the government and US car mfg lobbyists in DC for that. But Nissan (and all Japanese auto mfgr's as a group) do have means to put lobby-style pressure on lawmakers in the US. Unfortunately, the only statement Nissan has made on this matter (in regards to the Ariya) was weak-kneed, abstract, and fairly ambivalent.

Nissan needs to be more specific in telling us what exactly they are doing (with whatever army of lawyers are at their disposal) to ensure eligibility for all Ariya pre-order holders, in exactly the same way it was eligible when we placed the orders. What they offered (in the form of 'signed agreements') last summer in retrospect seems like smoke-in-mirrors to just keep the order holders onboard.

I can't afford (nor do I wish) to retain the services of a tax attorney well-versed in these matters. But Nissan can... and they should... and they need to do this and get us a solid 'yes' or 'no' answer regarding the fed $7500 incentive. I can't just go on 'hope' when it comes to $7500. Especially given that so many similar EV's now get the credit - when previously they didn't!

Trying to make a sound financial decision when buying an EV is extremely difficult, given depreciation curves unique to EV's, and all of the weird fed, state/regional tax issues and yearly license/registration upcharges. Given all of the convoluted math, it's nearly impossible to create a data-driven cost/value model; so it devolves into a caveman-like decision process driven more by hunger/instinct than by logic. I don't mind buying cars based on passion... but EV's don't qualify as a passion purchase in my book (as would a R35 GT-R or BMW M3 for instance). EV's are a logic purchase, just like the Leaf.

So if I can't make a logic-based decision, I'll just keep driving my logical little Leaf until I can.
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What you said, is exactly where I'm at today, given everything that I know at the moment. That's not where I was when I ordered the Ariya, and I'm not blaming Nissan for this - but probably the biggest reason that I'm "not there" anymore is because the $7500 tax incentive is gone. Obviously you can thank the government and US car mfg lobbyists in DC for that. But Nissan (and all Japanese auto mfgr's as a group) do have means to put lobby-style pressure on lawmakers in the US. Unfortunately, the only statement Nissan has made on this matter (in regards to the Ariya) was week-kneed, abstract, and fairly ambivalent.

Nissan needs to be more specific in telling us what exactly they are doing (with whatever army of lawyers are at their disposal) to ensure eligibility for all Ariya pre-order holders, in exactly the same way it was eligible when we placed the orders. What they offered (in the form of 'signed agreements') last summer in retrospect seems like smoke-in-mirrors to just keep the order holders onboard.

I can't afford (nor do I wish) to retain the services of a tax attorney well-versed in these matters. But Nissan can... and they should... and they need to do this and get us a solid 'yes' or 'no' answer regarding the fed $7500 incentive. I can't just go on 'hope' when it comes to $7500. Especially given that so many similar EV's now get the credit - when previously they didn't!

Trying to make a sound financial decision when buying an EV is extremely difficult, given depreciation curves unique to EV's, and all of the weird fed, state/regional tax issues and yearly license/registration upcharges. Given all of the convoluted math, it's nearly impossible to create a data-driven cost/value model; so it devolves into a caveman-like decision process driven more by hunger/instinct than by logic. I don't mind buying cars based on passion... but EV's don't qualify as a passion purchase in my book (as would a R35 GT-R or BMW M3 for instance). EV's are a logic purchase, just like the Leaf.

So if I can't make a logic-based decision, I'll just keep driving my logical little Leaf until I can.
If we owned a Leaf + trim I doubt that my wife and I would ever have considered the Ariya. It鈥檚 a different equation for us since our Leaf is a 2011 SL that we purchased new. Don鈥檛 get me wrong we love our Leaf for the most part but find there are two shortcomings. #1. The HVAC is marginal at best since in first gen Leaf Heat Pumps were not an option. We do have heated front/rear seats and steering wheel which helps but in the winter the resistance heater just doesn鈥檛 cut it. ( My wife likes to be warm! ) #2. When we purchased our first gen Leaf because of the small 24KW battery we knew we were signing up for an EV with limited range so it became our commuter and grocery getter. So we must continue to only drive our Leaf around town and rely on a second ICE vehicle for our long range trips. In my working career one of the perks of my job was to be provided with a vehicle of my choice. After several years I came to appreciate the value of having a pickup truck at my disposal. Once I entered retirement I missed that truck in our driveway. So now we have (3) vehicles in our fleet to personally maintain and insure. Bottom line: Hoping the Ariya is a sensible solution to reduce our fleet back down to (2) vehicles.
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We bought a 2017 Leaf new after Nissan reduced the price by 10k because the second generation Leaf was about to be released. After the trade in of our 2011 Subaru, the purchase price of the Leaf was about 10k. The Leaf has served us well for in-town transportation here in Bend, about 42,000 miles in almost six years. I have a 4x4 pickup that is used only for occasional hauling, to pull our travel trailer or when we get a significant snowfall. The Ariya will give us the option of venturing father afield in Oregon while affording a bit of luxury and useful technology not present in the Leaf. With solar panels on the house that predate the purchase of the Leaf, we have driven it almost cost free since day one. The level two charger in the garage will work with the Ariya as well, when it finally arrives!
We bought a 2017 Leaf new after Nissan reduced the price by 10k because the second generation Leaf was about to be released. After the trade in of our 2011 Subaru, the purchase price of the Leaf was about 10k. The Leaf has served us well for in-town transportation here in Bend, about 42,000 miles in almost six years. I have a 4x4 pickup that is used only for occasional hauling, to pull our travel trailer or when we get a significant snowfall. The Ariya will give us the option of venturing father afield in Oregon while affording a bit of luxury and useful technology not present in the Leaf. With solar panels on the house that predate the purchase of the Leaf, we have driven it almost cost free since day one. The level two charger in the garage will work with the Ariya as well, when it finally arrives!
Forgot to mention that we also installed 55 PV solar panels on our homes roof in 2014. It been 100% trouble free and has proven to be a wise investment. So with our solar array in place it only makes financial sense to replace our aging 2011 Leaf with another EV that can provide us with longer range. BTW I鈥檓 keeping my truck!
What you said, is exactly where I'm at today, given everything that I know at the moment. That's not where I was when I ordered the Ariya, and I'm not blaming Nissan for this - but probably the biggest reason that I'm "not there" anymore is because the $7500 tax incentive is gone. Obviously you can thank the government and US car mfg lobbyists in DC for that. But Nissan (and all Japanese auto mfgr's as a group) do have means to put lobby-style pressure on lawmakers in the US. Unfortunately, the only statement Nissan has made on this matter (in regards to the Ariya) was weak-kneed, abstract, and fairly ambivalent.

Nissan needs to be more specific in telling us what exactly they are doing (with whatever army of lawyers are at their disposal) to ensure eligibility for all Ariya pre-order holders, in exactly the same way it was eligible when we placed the orders. What they offered (in the form of 'signed agreements') last summer in retrospect seems like smoke-in-mirrors to just keep the order holders onboard.

I can't afford (nor do I wish) to retain the services of a tax attorney well-versed in these matters. But Nissan can... and they should... and they need to do this and get us a solid 'yes' or 'no' answer regarding the fed $7500 incentive. I can't just go on 'hope' when it comes to $7500. Especially given that so many similar EV's now get the credit - when previously they didn't!

Trying to make a sound financial decision when buying an EV is extremely difficult, given depreciation curves unique to EV's, and all of the weird fed, state/regional tax issues and yearly license/registration upcharges. Given all of the convoluted math, it's nearly impossible to create a data-driven cost/value model; so it devolves into a caveman-like decision process driven more by hunger/instinct than by logic. I don't mind buying cars based on passion... but EV's don't qualify as a passion purchase in my book (as would a R35 GT-R or BMW M3 for instance). EV's are a logic purchase, just like the Leaf.

So if I can't make a logic-based decision, I'll just keep driving my logical little Leaf until I can.
Nissan could choose to issue 7500 to customers through leases and reverse their decision to not allow purchase of vehicles at the end of a lease. The IRS has qualified all EV leases regardless of manufacturing origin or battery contents for 7500 rebate. The issue though is that the 7500 goes to Nissan credit services, bot the customer. In a show of goodwill, Nissan could choose to pass that 7500 on and reverse theor decision on precenting lease buyouts ethis would essentially make the Ariya instantly qualified for the 7500 rebate. Unfortunately the only manufacturers passing on the 7500 lease money to customers at this time are Volkswagen and Mercedes.
While I still have a few more months (apparently) to make up my mind about the pending AWD Platinum+ purchase, I started thinking more honestly about why I decided the Ariya was for me.

After a bit of introspection, I arrived at a conclusion - I picked the Ariya, not because of the Airya per-se, but because of my Leaf.

I gotta be honest. I love my Leaf. My family loves it too. Everything about it has held up to all of my expectations, and more. Of the 2 dozen or so cars I've owned over the years, by far the Leaf was my 'smartest' purchase.

I say this mostly out of curiosity here amongst the community, and wanted to know if anyone else shares this sentiment?

Having ordered an AWD, I consider myself lucky - because I get to see what happens to all of you folks who are taking delivery of your FWD's now. And by the time I have to sign on the line which is dotted, this forum will likely have provided plenty of first-hand and honest assessment of what the Ariya is really like.

The Leaf set a high bar for trouble-free EV ownership, and a driving experience that isn't odd, or bothersome (in the way that I find bothersome a big vertical iPad glued to the center of the dashboard as some EV brands have chosen). But given the general goofyness and IMO disappointing behavior of Nissan during this whole Ariya ordering/buying experience, and the weird/arbitrary fed EV tax law changes since I placed my preorder so long ago, I'm really thinking it likely that I'm not going to be as happy with the Ariya as I have been with my Leaf (particularly if I don't get the $7500 credit).

Unfortunately, I think the 'Nissan' that rolled out the Leaf back in 2011, and the Nissan/Renault partnership that produced the Ariya, are indeed two different companies.

And as a life-long Datsun/Nissan/Infiniti fanboy, I find that kinda sad馃槬. I hope I'm wrong.
I have never owned a Leaf, but it is part of the reason we settled on the Ariya. When I started shopping for a new car a couple years ago, I planned to buy a new Prius, but my wife kept bringing up how much her friends in Arizona loved their Leaf, which is what got me thinking about going electric at all. So I set up test drives for the Leaf and Model Y, and we both really liked the Leaf. Only reasons we didn鈥檛 pull the trigger on one were that I was a little hesitant about having a CHAdeMO car when I was reading that charging companies were phasing out support, which didn鈥檛 make it sound like a good long-term proposition. Plus we were about to have a baby, and once I realized how much stuff we had to haul around, I started thinking we needed a bigger car. And at the time it sounded like the Ariya was right around the corner (oh, how young and naive we were!), and I figured that it would be the perfect fit: we鈥檇 get the things we like about the Leaf including a company with a long history producing EVs, plus more room, plus more range, plus more modern technology. Now that it looks like our Platinum+ might really deliver this year (and maybe even in the next few months l) we鈥檙e of course weighing our options again, but still leaning towards it being a good choice!
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