Nissan Ariya Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered User
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When do we expect to see the official EPA ranges on both single and dual-motor variant? How close you think they will match the Nissan internal estimate? I have my 3 year-old LEAF SL+ and it has about 190 mile real-world range versus the max @ 215 miles. It’s not bad at all. Nissan seems to be very slow on releasing information on the Ariya. Huh~~~
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
77 Posts
Even if the AWD's 265 mile estimated range does get validated by the EPA, that's still uncomfortably slim given the 87kw/h battery - which by comparison to most EV's available even into 2023, is enormous (ex: ~77kw/h on the AWD Telsa model Y long range).
Range is probably my #1 "issue" right now for the Ariya. Take off up to 15% for cold climate, another 10% for battery degradation into the first 5 years of ownership, and take off another 5% for 70mph sustained highway cruise, and another 10% because at most you'll access 90% of the 'full' capacity between charge cycles, and now you're left with a winter time 70mph cruise range of about 150 miles maximum. Keep that in mind when you're planning your Christmas drive from Portland to Salt Lake with the kids.
With 150 max range, you'll need to plan for recharge at about 120 miles intervals unless you're comfortable with risk, or are planning to wait for 100% charges at each station.
So just wanted to remind folks that 265 mile EPA range for the AWD may sound like plenty, but it's barely adequate for most scenarios, and not adequate for some unique ones.

TAKEAWAY: Even if you buy a Telsa model Y long range, you'll probably be taking your gas car to grandma's for Christmas.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
77 Posts
I just got data back from by buddy who took his brand new Tesla Model Y AWD long range from PDX to the Lake Tahoe area (1500 miles total). Temperatures ranged from 50F to 2F over the total of 4 days. Cruise was set a 65mph.

On average, he was only able to achieve 3.0 miles per kw/h given real-world driving conditions. The Tesla EPA rating of 330 miles puts the 'expected' average at 4.5 miles per kw/h. So that means in real world winter conditions on the West Coast of the US, the actual range of a brand new Tesla Model Y was just 220 miles, not 330 as 'expected'.

This helps illustrate the point I was making above in regards to the 265 mile EPA range for the AWD Ariya potentially being something closer to 175 in winter conditions (if we can use Tesla performance as a model at least). With that range, you'd need to plan for recharging at no more than 150 mile intervals. And that's with a battery with 0% degradation.

Cold weather (and elevation) dramatically affects actual real-world EV range. I wonder how many potential Ariya buyers really understand this?

We clearly need better a better highway recharge infrastructure if EV's are going to take off as true gas replacements. So far, Electrify America has appeared to not be up to that challenge. I cannot justify buying a nearly $60k EV if I can only use it as an around-town grocery getter. This is a problem much more for Ariya buyers than it is for Tesla buyers; since even with the range hit, the Tesla Supercharger network provided the charge locations necessary to make the trip (due in large part to the new Supercharger that just came online in Susanville, CA).

So what's your opinion? Is a 265 EPA range a sticking point? Does being at the mercy of Electrify America (or other third-parties) concern you?
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
54 Posts
My Model Y can easily get between 3.6 to 3.9 mi/kWh in flat warm Florida. It's my second one too so I know how efficient they can be at highway speeds compared other EVs.

I previously owned an ID.4 and Mach-E and hated charging at EA stations because of the random problems I'd encounter and without shade it was unpleasant to have to be calling customer support in 90-95F humid Florida weather. Basically if you buy a CCS1-based EV (non-Tesla) it is very much a city car until the government spends that $7.5B EV infrastructure money and builds DC chargers across the country. It's fine because I want a Mach-E GTPE to rip around the city. I'm looking at the Arriya or Solterra as a possible RAV4 Prime replacement but I think both EV lack the range.

Any EV purchaser these days is an early adopter. It's why you get the $7500 tax credit.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
54 Posts
Tesla keeps talking about opening up their chargers to other EVs, but they also keep not doing it ... That would help too.
Tesla in the US can barely keep up with demand with their own cars. 320K+ Teslas sold in the US in 2021. Not enough chargers built.

In Europe, they offer significant subsidies and grants for chargers (EV & EV Charger Incentives in Europe: A Complete Guide for Businesses & Individuals). 50% in Finland, a couple hundred thousand per location in France, etc.
I can see why Tesla is taking that free money and opening up chargers.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top