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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will I be able to have level 2 (7 kw) charging by plugging the level 1 charge cord (with the appropriate adapter) directly into a 240 vac , 30 amp receptacle without installing a separate level 2 home charger?
 

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Hey @peterparch, that's what Nissan says here:
Charging at home
Charge your Nissan ARIYA at home and plug into the easy life with a 240-volt charging cable.
Wave “goodbye” to gas stations.
Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Automotive mirror Eyewear
 

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What is described above is the "granny charger" which allows you to charge at home (or wherever) without a dedicated charging station. However, such chargers typically do something like 1.3kW, not the 3.7/7.2/11/22 kW you can do on a real charging station.

If you have a space to park & charge at home, I highly encourage you to have a dedicated charging station installed. The granny charger is such a hassle that in practice you will not use it. Consider it a last resort in case you're stranded somewhere. In my 4 years of owning a Leaf, I've used it maybe 4 times, of which 3 times it blew out a fuse (on the socket/house, not the car). It's pretty useless.
 

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The Ariya’s 7.2 kW onboard charger gets electricity to charge from a home “charging” cable or station (technically, Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment or EVSE).

To use the full 7.2 kW, your home EVSE station has to be rated for the appropriate current draw at 240 V. A 32 Amp EVSE station (on a 40 Amp circuit for electrical code safety) should be able to handle up to 7.68 kW at 240 V.

I am still confused. If the Ariya has a 7.2 kw onboard charger, why do you also need a separate home charging station which has the same output capacity as the onboard charger?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for the info, weekenddays.
Using the appropriately sized charging cable, can the ev then be charged at 7.2 kw by plugging the power supply end of the cable directly into a 240 vac, 40 amp receptacle (like an electric stove receptacle) without using an intervening at home charging station?
 

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Yes, peterparch. The “appropriately sized charging cable” is the EVSE, whether it’s portable or permanently installed as a charging station. One end of the EVSE is either hardwired or plugged into a 240 vac receptacle; the other end has the J1772 plug to connect to the vehicle charging port.
By contrast, a level 1 or granny charger is plugged into a standard 120 vac receptacle and the other end has a J1772 plug. Similar look, but much slower charging at ~1.3kW power.

Thank you for the info, weekenddays.
Using the appropriately sized charging cable, can the ev then be charged at 7.2 kw by plugging the power supply end of the cable directly into a 240 vac, 40 amp receptacle (like an electric stove receptacle) without using an intervening at home charging station?
 

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Thank you for the info, weekenddays.
Using the appropriately sized charging cable, can the ev then be charged at 7.2 kw by plugging the power supply end of the cable directly into a 240 vac, 40 amp receptacle (like an electric stove receptacle) without using an intervening at home charging station?
The car communicates with the EVSE during charging for safety reasons. While the car could theoretically charge using a straight cable with no control circuitry built into it, it won't.
Seems to be somewhat difficult to find articles that explain why in any detail, but here's a couple:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Atrius, I noticed that the articles in the links that you included in your post are both over 10 years old. Has nothing changed since then? I spoke to a Tesla owner recently who charges by plugging directly into a 240 vac 30 amp receptacle.
 

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No, in terms of charge cords and what you're talking about, nothing has changed since then. Some have more features, like bluetooth or wireless connectivity and apps for the charge cord itself for monitoring the charge.

As for the person you talked to, either he mistook what you meant and plugs his charge cord (with the control box) into a 240V 30 amp outlet, which is very possible, or he's done something to trick the car into thinking there's a proper charge cord attached when there isn't.
 
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