Nissan Ariya Forum banner
21 - 35 of 35 Posts

· Registered User
Joined
·
7 Posts
I’m confused by your response. One can leave the car in D and change the drive mode to Eco, which is what I meant by Eco mode D. Unless North American cars have a different configuration? I’ve done a large amount of my 6,000 miles in this mode.

Regenerative braking occurs in all modes, not just when using e-step. taking power from the battery , or using re-gen to put it back always incurs losses. As Homer Simpson once said. “In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics. “

using eco will enable full coasting which some people don’t like the runaway feeling like a gas car in neutral, but it’s usually the most efficient driving style as hypermilers will attest.

Think of the brake pedal as a variable regen pedal. Friction brakes are only blended in at significant G levels, unless the battery is at 100% and there’s no place for the power to go.
 

· Registered User
Joined
·
250 Posts
Think of the brake pedal as a variable regen pedal. Friction brakes are only blended in at significant G levels, unless the battery is at 100% and there’s no place for the power to go.
Most important detail you have written here. This doesn't apply to cars that don't have regenerative braking on the brake pedal.

In my hybrid I just coast then gradually apply the brake pedal to engage regenerative breaking. Applying regenerative braking at lower speeds results in less losses, since the losses will be proportional to the vehicle speed.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
275 Posts
You can put the Ariya in either "Eco" mode and/or "B" mode or "D" mode. There is no "Eco" mode "D". Also, doesn't use of the E-Step allow for regenerative braking thus extending range?
Unlike Tesla, on the Ariya regenerative braking works in all modes. When you press the brake pedal in the Ariya, it will brake regeneratively until you're pressing hard enough that it needs to engage the physical brakes to stop as quickly as you're asking it to. This is also how most hybrids, such as the Prius, work. The Ariya's brakes are especially well integrated, making it difficult to tell when regenerative stops and physical braking begins

I didn't care much for E-Step personally. "Eco" appears to limit your acceleration much more than the other modes do, so would be better than those for energy conservation if one is doing a lot of stop and go or getting on/off the freeway. I've personally found I prefer "standard" mode with B on the shifter to any of the others for daily driving. D coasts just a little too much to me.

BTW, in the climate control screen you can also turn off climate control features for all seating positions except the driver. If you're alone that would also conserve a little energy.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
275 Posts
So far, after only a week so not really long enough, I'm coming in at around 270 miles range with my commute. This week was relatively warm for Ohio. My drive is 40 miles one way, with about 10 miles on 50 mph surface streets, 30 miles at 70 mph, and a little low speed wiggling.
 

· Registered User
Joined
·
34 Posts
So far, after only a week so not really long enough, I'm coming in at around 270 miles range with my commute. This week was relatively warm for Ohio. My drive is 40 miles one way, with about 10 miles on 50 mph surface streets, 30 miles at 70 mph, and a little low speed wiggling.
I have noticed my mileage to go up after a few charge.. even though my driving has been fairly same throughout. I guess you might see that as well
 

· Registered User
Joined
·
7 Posts
Thanks for your clarification. Just curious, what’s you kilometers/kWh average? What kind of driving do you primarily do. Where do you live in Scotland?
my average is around 3 miles/kWh. Driving is mixed from short local commuting which can see as low as 2.5 m/kWh. Longer runs sees low threes.

I live in Fife which many will know as the home of golf with St Andrews Nearby. We had a very pleasant drive yesterday to Loch Lomond with the car averaging 3.2 in 6C temperatures.

What I find with the Ariya ( and other large EVs) is that there’s a significant load in getting the cabin up to temperature which is why efficiency looks poor on short trips.
 

· Registered User
Joined
·
41 Posts
my average is around 3 miles/kWh. Driving is mixed from short local commuting which can see as low as 2.5 m/kWh. Longer runs sees low threes.

I live in Fife which many will know as the home of golf with St Andrews Nearby. We had a very pleasant drive yesterday to Loch Lomond with the car averaging 3.2 in 6C temperatures.

What I find with the Ariya ( and other large EVs) is that there’s a significant load in getting the cabin up to temperature which is why efficiency looks poor on short trips.
I’ve been to your fine city and St. Andrew’s! Lovely area. I just returned from a 300-mile trip. Outside temp. hovered around 42-44f. Used heater exclusively. Used “Eco” and “B”. Mostly highway speeds. Averaged 3.5 miles/kWh. I did charge at a DC fast charger and added 25% in 20-minutes. Charger only dispensed electricity at 53W even though it was capable of 350W.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top